Arrive Alive

Hostage Situations and Hijacking

 

SAFETY HINTS: HOSTAGE SITUATIONS AND HIJACKING

The following safety hints are aimed at providing a potential hostage or hijacking victim with practical advice and enhance road safety. It is important to note that most hostages, victims of hijacking survive the incident and are eventually released or rescued. In most instances, injuries and deaths are the result of inconsiderate actions taken by the victims themselves. There are certain guidelines that could increase a victim’s chances of survival and decrease the risk of humiliation, discomfort and injury:

KNOW WHAT TO EXPECT AS A VICTIM

  • People who are taken hostage or hijacked, tend to experience feelings of anxiety, shock, disbelief and confusion.
  • This first reaction usually leads to resistance, or retaliation which could have fatal consequences.
  • Prepare yourself to be alone and isolated from your family, friends or loved ones, and to lose track of time and place.

KNOW WHAT TO EXPECT OF THE PERPETRATORS

  • They could be tense, anxious and nervous.
  • They could display a tendency to overreact.

DO'S

  • Do everything the perpetrators tell you to do.
  • Try at all times to maintain your pride, dignity and self-respect.
  • Keep your brain active by playing games in your mind (mind games), daydreaming and reading whatever you are offered.
  • To maintain your physical strength you should eat the food provided by your captor(s).
  • Try to maintain a sense of humor, but do not ridicule the aggressors.
  • Try to remain orientated regarding your movements, directions, time and place.
  • Try to maintain a routine and remain fit, if circumstances permit.
  • Allow yourself to be led by your captor(s).
  • Try to remain cool and calm.
  • Fall flat and remain down during the relieving attack

DON'TS

  • Do not at any time become panic stricken or hysterical.
  • Do not offer any form of resistance.
  • Do not become abusive and aggressive or lose your temper.
  • Do not threaten or provoke the captor(s).
  • Do not try to be a hero.
  • Do not engage in an argument with the captor(s).
  • Do not engage in any whispered conversations with the perpetrators.
  • Do not use foreign concepts or languages, as this could arouse the captors’ suspicions.
  • Do not make any demands.
  • Do not be sympathetic towards your captors’ cause.
  • Do not try to escape, as this could place you at risk.

These safety hints are published by the South African Police Service, Division: Crime Prevention, in support of actions taken by hostage negotiators in the best interest of the community.

YOUR SAFETY IS OUR CONCERN

Loading...

Search Road Safety Articles

Latest Pages

GPS and Road Safety

GPS and Road Safety

Background to GPS What is GPS? The Global Positioning System (GPS) is the only fully functional Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Utilizing a constellation of at least 24 Medium Earth Orbit satellites that transmit precise microwave signals, the system enables a GPS receiver to determine

Read More

Guardrails, Road Barriers and Road Safety

Guardrails, Road Barriers and Road Safety

Introduction During recent years we have often shared road crash reports where road users crashed into guardrails and road barriers. In some incidents, we witnessed rather horrific injuries, and these often create questions regarding these traffic safety systems. How much thought and planning

Read More

Safely Sharing the Roads With Trucks - Avoiding Blind Spots And No-Go Zones

Safely Sharing the Roads With Trucks - Avoiding Blind Spots And No-Go Zones

Front no-go zone Cutting in front of a truck can be a fatal mistake. At 80km/h, it takes the length of about a rugby field (100 metres) for a truck to come to a complete stop. Safety tips: Allow at least one car length for every 16km/h you are travelling before merging in front of a truck. When

Read More

Road Safety Advice for foreigners driving in South Africa

Road Safety Advice for foreigners driving in South Africa

Overview /Background information South Africa has much to offer for international tourists and more and more is done to ensure an enjoyable and safe stay for our international visitors. Tourism authorities in South Africa would like to promote the beauty of tourism destinations across the country

Read More

Overloading and Road Safety

Overloading and Road Safety

Background Overloading has been recognized to be both a safety concern as well as a cost concern, and the National Department of Transport has incorporated a campaign against overloading in its Road to Safety strategy. Economic growth demands an adequate transport infrastructure. Overloaded vehicles,

Read More

Cycling Safety

Cycling Safety

Cycling safety has become a major concern on the South Africa roads as there has been a significant increase in the number of fatal road crashes and accidents involving cyclists. The Road Traffic Management Corporation has disclosed that the road deaths among our cyclists climbed from 320 in 2015

Read More

Load More Pages

Partners

View All