Arrive Alive

Accident Types

TYPES OF ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS AND CONTRIBUTORY FACTORS AND TYPE PERCENT OF ALL CASUALTY ACCIDENTS

-::- SAME DIRECTION GROUP -::-

Some contributory factors:

  • following too close
  • dirty, poor or no rear vehicle lights and dirty chevrons
  • poor brakes
  • smooth/damaged tyres

Some contributory factors:

  • turn in front of oncoming traffic
  • enter main road without giving way or stopping
  • inconsiderate driving behaviour
  • no indicator lights

Some contributory factors:

  • turn in front of other traffic
  • failing to indicate lane change
  • or change of direction
  • inconsiderate driving behaviour

Some contributory factors:

  • unsafe overtaking
  • swerve in front of other traffic
  • failing to indicate lane change
  • inconsiderate driving behaviour

-::- OPPOSITE DIRECTION GROUP -::-

Some contributory factors:

  • unsafe overtaking
  • overtaking across barrier lines
  • poor visibility
  • reckless and inconsiderate driving behaviour

Some contributory factors:

  • unsafe overtaking
  • overtaking across barrier lines
  • veering into opposing lane
  • poor visibility

Some contributory factors:

  • turn in front of oncoming traffic
  • failing to switch headlights on
  • failing to stop at traffic control: robot, stop or yield sign and traffic officers

-::- RIGHT ANGLE GROUP -::-

Some contributory factors:

  • failing to stop at traffic control: robot, stop or yield sign and traffic officers
  • robots out of order
  • missing stop or yield sign

Some contributory factors:

  • failing to stop at traffic control: robot, stop or yield sign and traffic officers
  • robots out of order
  • missing stop or yield sign
  • poor brakes

-::- REVERSING AND PARKING GROUP -::-

Some contributory factors:

  • inconsiderate, unlawful and negligent driving behaviour
  • poor brakes

Some contributory factors:

  • inconsiderate and negligent driving behaviour

-::- PEDESTRIAN, BICYCLE, ANIMAL, VEHICLE OVERTURN AND FIXED OBJECT GROUP -::-

Some contributory factors:

  • pedestrians jay-walking
  • intoxicated pedestrian
  • vehicle speed
  • poor street lighting and visibility
  • Inadequate pedestrian and cyclist facilities
  • bicycles without lights

Some contributory factors:

  • speed too high for circumstances
  • fatigue
  • poor visibility
  • tyre burst
  • swerving to avoid accident

Some contributory factors:

  • speed too high for circumstances
  • poor steering
  • poor brakes
  • fatigue and falling asleep
  • poor visibility
  • swerving to avoid accident
  • inadequate signposting

Non-wearing of seatbelts increase the risk of serious injury or death by between 40% and 50% in case of an accident.

More than 95% of all road accidents happen as a direct result of a traffic offence. Most accidents can be attributed to 2 or more simultaneous traffic offences. Generally human factors, such as non-adherence to traffic rules and legislation and aggressive, reckless, negligent and inconsiderate driving behaviour, failing to stop at traffic signals, unsafe and illegal overtaking, as well as inappropriate speed for circumstances and driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs are major contributory factors, totalling to about 70% to 80%. Vehicle fitness aspects such as smooth tyres, poor brakes, defective lights, steering and suspension of the vehicle contribute to between 10% and 15%, while road and environmental factors such as poor road conditions and signposting, poor fencing, allowing stray animals on the road, poor visibility, etc contribute to between 5% and 10%.

Search Road Safety Articles

Latest Pages

Trauma Counselling and first responders / paramedics

Trauma Counselling and first responders / paramedics

With the daily carnage on the roads of South Africa, it is not only the victims of road crashes that are exposed to trauma. Our first responders to these road crashes such as paramedics and members of the police are exposed to the trauma of horrific crashes and it is important that the long-term effects

Read More

Driving in Winter / Driving on Snow and Ice

Driving in Winter / Driving on Snow and Ice

Driving in winter may be hazardous for the unprepared and inexperienced driver. Although South Africa is not as well known for extreme winter conditions, such conditions may be extremely hazardous and many drivers might need to consider measures relating to the condition of their car as well as driving

Read More

Emergency Response Time and Response to Road Crashes

Emergency Response Time and Response to Road Crashes

Few road users are aware of the factors that could determine the time needed to respond to a vehicle accident. It is important for road users to be aware of these factors as well as steps that they can take to assist emergency teams in responding swiftly to accidents. Emergency response providers have

Read More

Safety when Witnessing and Reporting Crime on the Roads

Safety when Witnessing and Reporting Crime on the Roads

We sadly experience on our roads, not only threats from irresponsible and bad drivers but also threats to life and property from criminals targeting road users. Nearly every day we are warned of or hear about a protest action on a road somewhere, a hijack or a cash-in-transit robbery. On the Arrive

Read More

Safety and Safe Driving in Areas of Public Violence

Safety and Safe Driving in Areas of Public Violence

Introduction South Africans have in recent months experienced many traffic delays, disruptions and at times total road closures brought about by protests, riots and incidents of public violence. These protests were related to service delivery, education issues, politics and several social issues. It

Read More

Crime as a Threat to Road Safety in South Africa

Crime as a Threat to Road Safety in South Africa

South Africans live in a country blessed with beauty and diversity. We share a country with a colourful history having overcome rather significant and unique challenges. However proudly South African, we may be, we have to admit that we face serious challenges to safety daily at our homes, places

Read More

Load More Pages

Partners

View All