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Overhang from a vehicle and flags for Safety

Overhang from a vehicle and flags for SafetyIntroduction:

We often find drivers transporting goods and materials that cannot safely fit inside their vehicles. This need not be your usual overloading but rather instances where the object is too lengthy or wide to fit in the vehicle.

These objects such as ladders are then transported on the roof of vehicles or protruding from vehicles.

When they have an overhang they can present a significant threat to the safety of other road users who have to navigate safely behind and around these vehicles..

In this section, we would like to consider the legal stipulations and rules of the road as well as how other road users can be protected.

Unsafe warning to other road users of overhang from vehicles

Unsafe warning to other road users of overhang from vehiclesUnsafe warning to other road users of overhang from vehiclesUnsafe warning to other road users of overhang from vehicles

The Rules of the Road and Overhang from a vehicle

Projections in case of vehicle other than motor cycle, motor tricycle or pedal cycle

Reg 227. (1) No person shall operate on a public road a vehicle, other than a motor cycle, motor tricycle or pedal cycle-

(a) carrying any goods which project-

(i) either side of the longitudinal centre-line of the vehicle by more than

(aa) in the case of a bus contemplated in regulation 223(a) or a goods vehicle contemplated in regulation 223(b), one comma three metres; or

(bb) in the case of any other vehicle, one comma two five metres: Provided that any side mirror or direction indicator on the vehicle shall not be taken into account;

(ii) more than 300 millimetres beyond the front end of the vehicle; or

(iii) more than one comma eight metres beyond the rear end of the vehicle; or

(b) of which

(i) the front overhang, together with any projection, exceeds the front overhang as provided in regulation 226(1)(b); or

(ii) any bracket projects more than 150 millimetres beyond the widest part of the vehicle.

(2) No person shall operate on a public road a vehicle or combination of vehicles where the combined length of such vehicle or combination of vehicles and any projection exceeds the overall length prescribed in regulation 221 for such vehicle or combination of vehicles.

Warning other road users of any overhang

Warning in respect of projecting load

Warning other road users of any overhang

Reg 229. (1) No person shall operate a vehicle on a public road if the load on such vehicle projects more than 150 millimetres beyond the side thereof, unless-

(a) during the period between sunset and sunrise and at any other time when, due to insufficient light or unfavourable weather conditions, persons and vehicles upon the public road would not be clearly visible at a distance of 150 metres, the extent of such projection is indicated-

(i) by means of either a white retro reflector or a lamp emitting a white light, fitted at the outer edge of the front of such load; and

(ii) by means of either a red retro reflector or a lamp emitting a red light, fitted at the outer edge of the rear of such load; and

(b) during any other period, the extent of such projection is indicated by means of flags of red cloth, not less than 300 millimetres by 300 millimetres, suspended by two adjacent corners thereof transversely to the direction in which the vehicle is travelling, from the front and rear of such projection.

(2) No person shall operate a vehicle on a public road if the load on such vehicle projects more than 300 millimetres beyond the rear thereof, unless-

(a) during the period between sunset and sunrise and at any other time when, due to insufficient light or unfavourable weather conditions, persons and vehicles upon the public road would not be clearly visible at a distance of 150 metres-

(i) the width of such projection is indicated by means of red retro reflectors or lamps emitting a red light fitted on the end of such projection: Provided that where the width of any such projection is less than 600 millimetres it shall be sufficient for the purpose of indicating such width to fit one retro reflector or lamp on the end thereof; and

(ii) the length of such projection is indicated by means of yellow retro reflectors or lamps emitting a yellow light fitted on both sides of such projection at the end thereof; and

(b) during any other period, the length of such projection is indicated by means of a red flag or red cloth, not less than 300 millimetres by 300 millimetres, suspended by two adjacent corners thereof transversely to the direction in which the vehicle is travelling, from the end of such projection, and the width of such projection is indicated by means of such flags suspended by two adjacent corners thereof parallel to the direction in which the vehicle is travelling, from both sides of such projection at the end thereof: Provided that where the width of such projection is less than 600 millimetres it shall be sufficient for the purposes of indicating such projection to suspend one such flag from the end thereof.

(3) For the purposes of this regulation, the light of any lamp shall comply with the provisions of regulation 158(2).

How to use your Red Flags Correctly

Images of Red Flags used correctly

How to use your Red Flags CorrectlyHow to use your Red Flags CorrectlyHow to use your Red Flags Correctly

Also view:

Overloading and Road Safety

How long may a pole or ladder overhang from your vehicle?

What is the legally allowed overhang on a flat-bed bakkie?

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