Arrive Alive

Accident Types

TYPES OF ROAD TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS AND CONTRIBUTORY FACTORS AND TYPE PERCENT OF ALL CASUALTY ACCIDENTS

-::- SAME DIRECTION GROUP -::-

Some contributory factors:

  • following too close
  • dirty, poor or no rear vehicle lights and dirty chevrons
  • poor brakes
  • smooth/damaged tyres

Some contributory factors:

  • turn in front of oncoming traffic
  • enter main road without giving way or stopping
  • inconsiderate driving behaviour
  • no indicator lights

Some contributory factors:

  • turn in front of other traffic
  • failing to indicate lane change
  • or change of direction
  • inconsiderate driving behaviour

Some contributory factors:

  • unsafe overtaking
  • swerve in front of other traffic
  • failing to indicate lane change
  • inconsiderate driving behaviour

-::- OPPOSITE DIRECTION GROUP -::-

Some contributory factors:

  • unsafe overtaking
  • overtaking across barrier lines
  • poor visibility
  • reckless and inconsiderate driving behaviour

Some contributory factors:

  • unsafe overtaking
  • overtaking across barrier lines
  • veering into opposing lane
  • poor visibility

Some contributory factors:

  • turn in front of oncoming traffic
  • failing to switch headlights on
  • failing to stop at traffic control: robot, stop or yield sign and traffic officers

-::- RIGHT ANGLE GROUP -::-

Some contributory factors:

  • failing to stop at traffic control: robot, stop or yield sign and traffic officers
  • robots out of order
  • missing stop or yield sign

Some contributory factors:

  • failing to stop at traffic control: robot, stop or yield sign and traffic officers
  • robots out of order
  • missing stop or yield sign
  • poor brakes

-::- REVERSING AND PARKING GROUP -::-

Some contributory factors:

  • inconsiderate, unlawful and negligent driving behaviour
  • poor brakes

Some contributory factors:

  • inconsiderate and negligent driving behaviour

-::- PEDESTRIAN, BICYCLE, ANIMAL, VEHICLE OVERTURN AND FIXED OBJECT GROUP -::-

Some contributory factors:

  • pedestrians jay-walking
  • intoxicated pedestrian
  • vehicle speed
  • poor street lighting and visibility
  • Inadequate pedestrian and cyclist facilities
  • bicycles without lights

Some contributory factors:

  • speed too high for circumstances
  • fatigue
  • poor visibility
  • tyre burst
  • swerving to avoid accident

Some contributory factors:

  • speed too high for circumstances
  • poor steering
  • poor brakes
  • fatigue and falling asleep
  • poor visibility
  • swerving to avoid accident
  • inadequate signposting

Non-wearing of seatbelts increase the risk of serious injury or death by between 40% and 50% in case of an accident.

More than 95% of all road accidents happen as a direct result of a traffic offence. Most accidents can be attributed to 2 or more simultaneous traffic offences. Generally human factors, such as non-adherence to traffic rules and legislation and aggressive, reckless, negligent and inconsiderate driving behaviour, failing to stop at traffic signals, unsafe and illegal overtaking, as well as inappropriate speed for circumstances and driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs are major contributory factors, totalling to about 70% to 80%. Vehicle fitness aspects such as smooth tyres, poor brakes, defective lights, steering and suspension of the vehicle contribute to between 10% and 15%, while road and environmental factors such as poor road conditions and signposting, poor fencing, allowing stray animals on the road, poor visibility, etc contribute to between 5% and 10%.

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