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Scholar Patrol - Conditions of Use

5. CONDITIONS OF USE FOR SCHOLAR PATROLS
 

5.1 A scholar patrol may only operate at a registered crossing.

5.2 Should there not be a kerbstone or if the road is exceptionally wide at the pedestrian crossing, the members should either stand on the shoulder of the road or as indicated by the traffic authority. Where-ever possible the kerbstone must be used. Scholar patrol members may not stand on the road surface at any stage.

5.3 Members may under no circumstances move into the street to stop the traffic or to regulate it. At type A, B and H crossings the members of the patrol should only exhibit the stop sign boards horizontally with a movement of the body and arms, so that approaching drivers can see them clearly and stop in time.

5.4 Schools are held responsible for the proper supervision, storage and maintenance of the scholar patrol equipment. Should schools not comply with this requirement, their scholar patrols will be withdrawn.

5.5  Pre-warning signs must be erected irrespective of the type of crossing.

5.6 Adult supervision is compulsory and an absolute essential at all crossings.

5.7 Performance on gravel roads is permissible if the following are complied with:

  • vision / line of sight in both directions has to be good (not at blind rises, corners, dense bush / trees / buildings next to road, etc);
  • members may not stand on the road surface;
  • the local road safety component of the province should visit the crossing and ensure that the crossing complies with the prescribed safety requirements (the position of the crossings should be determined in conjunction with the applicable traffic authorities and the school);
  • such a crossing would be registered as a Type G (Open Crossing).

 

5.8 Performance on provincial and national roads is permissible as long as  the following conditions have been complied with :

  • the position of the crossing should be determined in conjunction with the traffic authority, the school and the province (stress must be placed on adequate visibility);
  • the members of the scholar patrol as well as the learners should be trained with regard to the use of the crossing;
  • controlled groups of children may cross the road per opportunity (once a group of children has crossed, the situation has to be re-evaluated for safety before the next group should be allowed to cross);
  • such a crossing would be registered as a Type G (Open Crossing).


5.9 Action at stop signs and / or traffic light controlled crossings in urban, rural and remote areas:

  • scholar patrols may not use stop sign boards at controlled crossings.  A stop-board operating scholar patrol may operate near to a controlled crossing only if no other solution is obtainable, but preferably to a minimum of 50 meters away from the controlled crossing;
  • scholar patrol crossings do not have the purpose of serving as a solution for traffic offences (for example, motorists who do not stop at stop streets or yield to pedestrians);
  • the function of the scholar patrol at a crossing is only to regulate and control pedestrians.

 

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